04/01/2014

Finding Meaning and Purpose in Retirement: Work and Non-Work Retirement Options

By Mary E. Ghilani

In a survey conducted by Del Webb, almost 80 percent of boomers expect to work in some capacity, even after they retire. Fifty-one percent plan to work full-time, while 28 percent say they expect to work part-time. Many are using retirement as a opportunity to change careers. The survey finds that 18 percent of boomers plan to pursue a new profession in their retirement. While 14 percent say they expect to primarily work from home. These are examples of the stated plans – and retirees should have plans (see Part 1 in Career Convergence: “Make a Retirement Plan Before You Retire”).

 

Helping Clients Create Meaning in Retirement

What differentiates today’s retirees from their predecessors? They seek to find the lifestyle qualities that Encore.org advocates, namely, one’s “purpose, passion, and paycheck in their second act.” For others, retirement is more about creating meaning than generating income. As Richard Leider, executive coach and co-author of Life Reimagined: Discovering Your New Life Possibilities writes, “People need a reason to get up in the morning.”

 

Many of the retirement-aged adults that I see haven’t given much thought to what they want to do for the next 10-25 years of their lives. They just know that they want to do something different. Self-assessment, such as identifying one’s interests, abilities, values, and personality type is critical to discovering a new career or lifestyle after retirement. Pay particular attention to wishes, dreams, and old regrets because retirement may be a time to realize those hopes and dreams. Whether your client wants to continue to work, volunteer, or just spend their time learning or doing new things, the key is to help them utilize a lifetime of accumulated experiences, yet be open to new possibilities.

 

The following is a sample of work and non-work options for retirees:

 

Career Change Examples

For clients who want to retire but don’t necessarily want to stop working, health care, security, retail, customer service, education, and business seem to be “age-friendly” industries, according to AARP.com. For clients who want to utilize their prior interests, skills and experiences, engaging in creative brainstorming can generate a whole new list of possibilities.

 

The following are some examples of new, but related, career options for a former English teacher:

Freelance writer, ESL teacher/tutor, translator, educational sales rep, book/magazine editor, copy writer for a marketing or advertising company, blogger, food or literary critic, social media content manager, and public relations or publicity staff.

 

If this individual has a master’s degree, then they could also teach at a college or university, become an academic advisor, admissions or student affairs staff, or run a grant program.

 

As the case with any type of change, there may be some reluctance, or fear, of venturing into the unknown. Encourage your clients to embrace change, take chances, meet new people, and learn new things. Most retirees have spent their working lives being “practical,” “responsible,” and caring for others. Retirement is the time for your clients to explore new opportunities and to focus on what they want for a change.

 

Reference

McWhinnie, E. (June 16, 2013).3 Ways Baby Boomers are Redefining Retirement. USA Today. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2013/06/15/baby-boomers-redefining-retirement/2426197/

 

 


 

Mary GhilaniMary E. Ghilani, M.S., NCC, is the director of career services at Luzerne County Community College in Pennsylvania where she provides career counseling and job search services to college students and community adults, including retirees. She is the author of Working in Your Major, Second Chance, and 10 Strategies for Reentering the Workforce. She can be reached at mghilani@luzerne.edu.

 

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9 Comments

Kate Jones on Wednesday 04/30/2014 at 10:25AM wrote:

Basing your Retirement Lifestyle on your natural inclinations can be so productive and fun. I run workshops and coach individuals to help you do just that! This article has great ideas.

Kate Jones on Wednesday 04/30/2014 at 10:25AM wrote:

Basing your Retirement Lifestyle on your natural inclinations can be so productive and fun. I run workshops and coach individuals to help you do just that! This article has great ideas.

Kate Jones on Wednesday 04/30/2014 at 10:25AM wrote:

Basing your Retirement Lifestyle on your natural inclinations can be so productive and fun. I run workshops and coach individuals to help you do just that! This article has great ideas.

Kate Jones on Wednesday 04/30/2014 at 10:25AM wrote:

Basing your Retirement Lifestyle on your natural inclinations can be so productive and fun. I run workshops and coach individuals to help you do just that! This article has great ideas.

Kate Jones on Wednesday 04/30/2014 at 10:51AM wrote:

Basing your Retirement Lifestyle on your natural inclinations can be so productive and fun. I run workshops and coach individuals to help you do just that! This article has great ideas.

Kate Jones on Wednesday 04/30/2014 at 10:52AM wrote:

Basing your Retirement Lifestyle on your natural inclinations can be so productive and fun. I run workshops and coach individuals to help you do just that! This article has great ideas.

Kate Jones on Wednesday 04/30/2014 at 10:52AM wrote:

Basing your Retirement Lifestyle on your natural inclinations can be so productive and fun. I run workshops and coach individuals to help you do just that! This article has great ideas.

Denise Hughes on Wednesday 04/30/2014 at 12:18PM wrote:

I recently read, from an unaccredited source, that "in retirement we must have direction and purpose, accept change, remain curious and confident, communicate and be committed." It reminded me of the focus taken by the authors who created the Retirement Dimensions tool. They were committed to creating a plan of direction, purpose, confidence and commitment for those entering, contemplating entering, or already in this next chapter of their lives through exploring their core values, strengths and needs.

Mary Ghilani on Wednesday 04/30/2014 at 01:02PM wrote:

Thanks for your comments, Kate and Denise.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed in the comments shown above are those of the individual comment authors and do not reflect the opinions of this organization.